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logic

logic


log·ic  (ljk)
n.
1. The study of the principles of reasoning, especially of the structure of propositions as distinguished from their content and of method and validity in deductive reasoning.
2.
a. A system of reasoning: Aristotles logic.
b. A mode of reasoning: By that logic, we should sell the company tomorrow.
c. The formal, guiding principles of a discipline, school, or science.
3. Valid reasoning: Your paper lacks the logic to prove your thesis.
4. The relationship between elements and between an element and the whole in a set of objects, individuals, principles, or events: Theres a certain logic to the motion of rush-hour traffic.
5. Computer Science
a. The nonarithmetic operations performed by a computer, such as sorting, comparing, and matching, that involve yes-no decisions.
b. Computer circuitry.
c. Graphic representation of computer circuitry.

[Middle English, from Old French logique, from Latin logica, from Greek logik (tekhn), (art) of reasoning, logic, feminine of logikos, of reasoning, from logos, reason; see leg- in Indo-European roots.]

logic [ˈlɒdʒɪk]
n
1. (Philosophy / Logic) the branch of philosophy concerned with analysing the patterns of reasoning by which a conclusion is properly drawn from a set of premises, without reference to meaning or context See also formal logic, deduction [4] induction [4]
2. (Philosophy / Logic) any particular formal system in which are defined axioms and rules of inference Compare formal system, formal language
3. the system and principles of reasoning used in a specific field of study
4. a particular method of argument or reasoning
5. force or effectiveness in argument or dispute
6. reasoned thought or argument, as distinguished from irrationality
7. the relationship and interdependence of a series of events, facts, etc.
(Philosophy / Logic)
chop logic to use excessively subtle or involved logic or argument
9. (Electronics & Computer Science / Computer Science) Electronics Computing
a.  the principles underlying the units in a computer system that perform arithmetical and logical operations See also logic circuit
b.  (as modifier) a logic element
[from Old French logique from Medieval Latin logica (neuter plural, treated in Medieval Latin as feminine singular), from Greek logikos concerning speech or reasoning]

logic  (ljk)
The study of the principles of reasoning, especially of the structure of propositions as distinguished from their content and of method and validity in deductive reasoning.


logic  /ldk/  n. [U] 1 a system of reasoning: She uses logic not emotion in all her decisions. 2 the study of principles of inference and reasoning: A course in mathematical logic can be quite difficult.

Thesaurus: logic 1 reason, good judgment, common sense 2 inductive reasoning. logic

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