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cycle

cycle


cy·cle  (skl)
n.
1. An interval of time during which a characteristic, often regularly repeated event or sequence of events occurs: Sunspots increase and decrease in intensity in an 11-year cycle.
2.
a. A single complete execution of a periodically repeated phenomenon: A year constitutes a cycle of the seasons.
b. A periodically repeated sequence of events: the cycle of birth, growth, and death; a cycle of reprisal and retaliation.
3. The orbit of a celestial body.
4. A long period of time; an age.
5.
a. The aggregate of traditional poems or stories organized around a central theme or hero: the Arthurian cycle.
b. A series of poems or songs on the same theme: Schuberts song cycles.
6. A bicycle, motorcycle, or similar vehicle.
7. Botany A circular or whorled arrangement of flower parts such as those of petals or sepals.
8. Linguistics In generative grammar, the principle that allows an ordered set of linguistic rules or operations to apply repeatedly to successive stages of a derivation. Often used with the.
v. cy·cled, cy·cling, cy·cles
v.intr.
1. To occur in or pass through a cycle.
2. To move in or as if in a cycle.
3. To ride a bicycle, motorcycle, or similar vehicle.
v.tr.
To use in or put through a cycle: cycled the heavily soiled laundry twice; cycling the recruits through eight weeks of basic training.

[Middle English, from Late Latin cyclus, from Greek kuklos, circle; see kwel-1 in Indo-European roots.]

cycler n.

cycle [ˈsaɪkəl]
n
1. a recurring period of time in which certain events or phenomena occur and reach completion or repeat themselves in a regular sequence
2. a completed series of events that follows or is followed by another series of similar events occurring in the same sequence
3. the time taken or needed for one such series
4. a vast period of time; age; aeon
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a group of poems or prose narratives forming a continuous story about a central figure or event the Arthurian cycle
6. (Performing Arts / Theatre) a series of miracle plays the Chester cycle
7. (Music, other) a group or sequence of songs (see song cycle)
8. short for bicycle, tricycle, motorcycle etc.
9. (Astronomy) Astronomy the orbit of a celestial body
10. (Life Sciences & Allied Applications / Biology) a recurrent series of events or processes in plants and animals a life cycle a growth cycle a metabolic cycle
11. (Physics / General Physics) Physics a continuous change or a sequence of changes in the state of a system that leads to the restoration of the system to its original state after a finite period of time
12. (Electronics) one of a series of repeated changes in the magnitude of a periodically varying quantity, such as current or voltage
13. (Electronics & Computer Science / Computer Science) Computing
a.  a set of operations that can be both treated and repeated as a unit
b.  the time required to complete a set of operations
c.  one oscillation of the regular voltage waveform used to synchronize processes in a digital computer
14. (Linguistics / Grammar) (in generative grammar) the set of cyclic rules
vb
1. (tr) to process through a cycle or system
2. (intr) to move in or pass through cycles
3. to travel by or ride a bicycle or tricycle
[from Late Latin cyclus, from Greek kuklos cycle, circle, ring, wheel; see wheel]
cycling  n & adj

cycle  (skl)
1. A single complete execution of a periodically repeated phenomenon. See also period.
2. A circular or whorled arrangement of flower parts such as those of petals or stamens.


cycle  /sakl/  n. 1 an event or activity that changes from time to time from one characteristic to another and then back to the first one: We have weather cycles of good rainfall, then dry weather, then rain again.||a business cycle 2 a bicycle or motorcycle
v. [I] -cled, -cling, -cles 1 to go through a cycle (weather, business) 2 to ride on a bicycle or motorcycle: He cycles to work on his motorcycle. -adj. cyclical /saklkl, sk/; cyclic.

Thesaurus: cycle n. 1 a sequence, phase. cycle

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